Antiques Roadshow Spring/Summer 2016

Editor's Note: I have been on the Antiques Roadshow as an appraiser for 21 years and while this face jug appraisal is now history, some important points must be made. First some very experienced appraisers at the show collaborated with Fletcher on the appraisal. Second the assessment at the show was done in an environment of very limited assets.. meaning no library, not much time, very few tools that are commonly used for examination, and most importantly not much collection history. In addition this is an area where idiosyncratic (meaning weird) objects are relatively common.  All this contributed to an incorrect value determination. Stephen Fletcher took the fall, which in my opinion (and I am not in any way speaking for Antiques Roadshow) was grossly unfair. To the contrary I believe Stephen Fletcher should be applauded as a stand up guy who took full responsibility and corrected his mistake. I would have Fletcher on my team any day knowing that I would get a smart competent appraiser who would stand behind his work. JB

1. BOSTON - Antiques Roadshow Accidentally Appraises High School Art Project at $50,000. Antiques Roadshow Accidentally Appraises High School Art Project at $50,000
Eliana Dockterman @edockterman. May 10, 2016. The show now says it's worth between $3,000 and $5,000
Fans of Antique Roadshow often wonder how certain pieces of art can cost that much. For once, they were right to be skeptical.
An ugly-faced jug was appraised at $50,000 on the show last year. The appraiser estimated it dated back to the late 19th or early 20th centuries. In fact, a woman actually made it in an Oregon high school art class in the 1970s. Horse trainer Betsy Soule claimed the piece when a friend recognized it on the show, according to the Bend Bulletin.
The show rarely makes such mistakes. The appraiser from that particular episode, Stephen L. Fletcher, released a statement in which he said, “as far as its age is concerned, I was fooled, as were some of my colleagues.” He has re-appraised the piece at $3,000 to $5,000 on the PBS website.
Eliana Dockterman @edockterman
May 10, 2016
The show now says it's worth between $3,000 and $5,000
Fans of Antique Roadshow often wonder how certain pieces of art can cost that much. For once, they were right to be skeptical.
An ugly-faced jug was appraised at $50,000 on the show last year. The appraiser estimated it dated back to the late 19th or early 20th centuries. In fact, a woman actually made it in an Oregon high school art class in the 1970s. Horse trainer Betsy Soule claimed the piece when a friend recognized it on the show, according to the Bend Bulletin.
We are all-new TONIGHT at 8/7c on @PBS. Does this face jug speak to you, and what does it say? pic.twitter.com/0jqgWwHrRO
Antiques Roadshow (@RoadshowPBS) January 11, 2016
The show rarely makes such mistakes. The appraiser from that particular episode, Stephen L. Fletcher, released a statement in which he said, “as far as its age is concerned, I was fooled, as were some of my colleagues.” He has re-appraised the piece at $3,000 to $5,000 on the PBS website.

2. BOSTON Antiques Roadshow From the Road....We have now visited four cities as part of season 21.. Orlando, Virginia Beach, Indianapolis, and this past weekend Fort Worth. Fort Worth was the only city we had not previously visited and I think most appraisers, staff, and crew were surprised how different this venue was from Dallas just 40 minutes away by car. Photo wizard Valerie Thompson took many shots which we will share on our social media platforms. Fort Worth was great fun, but now we turn our attention to Palm Springs in less that 2 weeks. Today the temperature is 109 degrees, so this will be an adjustment.